ZThemes

astronomy-to-zoology:

Agile Antechinus (Antechinus agilis)

….a species of dasyurid marsupial which is restricted wet and moist forests southeastern corner of Australia. Agile antechinus are mainly insectivorous, feeding on insects and occasionally small vertebrates and berries. Like all members of the genus Antechinus, A. agilis has a short and violent breeding season which causes all the males to die after breeding.  

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Mammalia-Marsupialia-Dasyuromorphia-Dasyuridae-Antechinus-A. agilis

Images: Mel Williams and Michael Sale

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in what looks like Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in what looks like Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

earthstory:

Atacama from above
Looking southeast from near the Chilean coast, the structures of the Andes are obvious from the space station. The Altiplano (aka Puna), sitting between 3 and 5,000 metres is visible in the foreground, graced by a line of young volcanoes. Between the upthrust blocks of the mountains gleam the salty white salares, seasonal salt lakes where rain gathers in outlet free basins and evaporates, leaving its cargo of minerals dissolved from the mountains behind. Near the centre of the picture a geological transition between the Altiplano and the lower altitude Sierras Pampeanas is visible. Far away to the upper left, the Atlantic coast, near Buenos Aires in Argentina. The colours reflect climate, with the nearby red-brown deserts of the western coast contrasting with the green agricultural plains of the distant pampas. The salares between them indicate a semi arid region between the two.

Loz
Image credit: NASA

earthstory:

Atacama from above

Looking southeast from near the Chilean coast, the structures of the Andes are obvious from the space station. The Altiplano (aka Puna), sitting between 3 and 5,000 metres is visible in the foreground, graced by a line of young volcanoes. Between the upthrust blocks of the mountains gleam the salty white salares, seasonal salt lakes where rain gathers in outlet free basins and evaporates, leaving its cargo of minerals dissolved from the mountains behind. Near the centre of the picture a geological transition between the Altiplano and the lower altitude Sierras Pampeanas is visible. Far away to the upper left, the Atlantic coast, near Buenos Aires in Argentina. The colours reflect climate, with the nearby red-brown deserts of the western coast contrasting with the green agricultural plains of the distant pampas. The salares between them indicate a semi arid region between the two.

Loz

Image credit: NASA

polymath4ever:

shychemist:

magnus2core:

This is a trilobite.  They are way past cool.  So is learning about evolution.

That is the coolest trilobite I’ve ever seen.

 

polymath4ever:

shychemist:

magnus2core:

This is a trilobite.  They are way past cool.  So is learning about evolution.

That is the coolest trilobite I’ve ever seen.


 

scinerds:

How Mysterious Natural Arches Form

Arches of stone seem to defy explanation, but a new study may have solved the mystery of how these and other strange natural stone wonders form.

The bewildering shapes apparently owe their origin in large part to how rock can strengthen when squashed from above, scientists explained.

Mysterious rock formations such as arches, bridges, pillars and mushroom-shaped pedestal rocks occur all over the world. Geologists mostly think these form due to erosion from wind and water, as well as from the weathering effects of salt and frost.

However, lead author of the new study Jiří Bruthans, a geologist at Charles University in Prague, and his colleagues did not think erosion and weathering alone could explain how many of these natural sculptures arose. They also noted that prior research did not explain how the upper parts of arches remain stable.

Now, the researchers said they can help explain how these rock formations develop by accounting for the way rock can strengthen when compacted by weight from above.

"The results were shocking for me when I started to realize how simply nature carves all these shapes," Bruthans said.

ancientpeoples:

Ivory horse frontlet 
Decorated with a nude goddess holding lions and lotus flowers
Mesopotamian, Assyrian Period, Neo-Assyrian, 9th - 8th century BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Ivory horse frontlet 

Decorated with a nude goddess holding lions and lotus flowers

Mesopotamian, Assyrian Period, Neo-Assyrian, 9th - 8th century BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

hinducosmos:

The submerged temples of Mahabalipuram (India)
According to popular belief, the famous Shore Temple at Mahabalipuram wasn’t a single temple, but the last of a series of seven temples, six of which had submerged. New finds suggest that there may be some truth to the story.
A major discovery of submerged ruins was made in April of 2002 offshore of Mahabalipuram in Tamil Nadu, South India. The discovery, at depths of 5 to 7 meters (15 to 21 feet) was made by a joint team from the Dorset based Scientific Exploration Society (SES) and marine archaeologists from India’s National Institute of Oceanography (NIO).
Investigations at each of the locations revealed stone masonry, remains of walls, square rock cut remains, scattered square and rectangular stone blocks and a big platform with steps leading to it. All these lay amidst the locally occurring geological formations of rocks.
—- 7 Most Fascinating Underwater Ruins : Oddee.com

hinducosmos:

The submerged temples of Mahabalipuram (India)

According to popular belief, the famous Shore Temple at Mahabalipuram wasn’t a single temple, but the last of a series of seven temples, six of which had submerged. New finds suggest that there may be some truth to the story.

A major discovery of submerged ruins was made in April of 2002 offshore of Mahabalipuram in Tamil Nadu, South India. The discovery, at depths of 5 to 7 meters (15 to 21 feet) was made by a joint team from the Dorset based Scientific Exploration Society (SES) and marine archaeologists from India’s National Institute of Oceanography (NIO).

Investigations at each of the locations revealed stone masonry, remains of walls, square rock cut remains, scattered square and rectangular stone blocks and a big platform with steps leading to it. All these lay amidst the locally occurring geological formations of rocks.

—- 7 Most Fascinating Underwater Ruins : Oddee.com

allthingsprimate:

How your click helps the Jane Goodall Institute

Your free click generates donations from our sponsors. You may click once a day, every day. 100% of the donations raised go directly to the Jane Goodall Institute, which runs sanctuaries in Africa where orphaned chimpanzees can be cared for and given the chance to live reasonably full lives in spacious conditions. Your click helps JGI feed these rescued primates.

Learn more here

allthingsprimate:

How your click helps the Jane Goodall Institute

Your free click generates donations from our sponsors. You may click once a day, every day. 100% of the donations raised go directly to the Jane Goodall Institute, which runs sanctuaries in Africa where orphaned chimpanzees can be cared for and given the chance to live reasonably full lives in spacious conditions. Your click helps JGI feed these rescued primates.

Learn more here

oosik:

Mount Spurr: Captain Cook State Recreation Area, Alaska

oosik:

Mount Spurr: Captain Cook State Recreation Area, Alaska

allthingsprimate:

Tiny gorilla by K.Verhulst

allthingsprimate:

Tiny gorilla by K.Verhulst