ZThemes
heartoflaos:

ADB again under fire over safeguards in Laos dam 
Written by Lean Alfred Santos of Devex
A Hmong family living along the Nam Ngiep. An energy project threatens to displace indigenous people and destroy the environment in the area. 
The Asian Development Bank is again under fire over alleged safeguards violations, this time about a hydropower project in Laos that two NGOs claim will displace indigenous people, affect livelihoods and destroy the area’s immediate environment.
ADB decided last week to give the green light to a $50 million loan for the dam in Nam Ngiep River in central Laos, which is expected to support the sustainable development of hydropower resources in the landlocked country and provide a reliable and affordable access to energy sources in neighboring Thailand. 
“Even though the project has been approved, it should be a point of warning. ADB has a number of instances of investing in power projects [that] are not sustainable because of the effects to people,” Tanya Lee, International Rivers program director for Laos, told Devex. “In Laos, the way the development is being distributed, it is not possible for people to benefit equally.”
About 3,000 individuals from neighboring Hmong and Khmu ethnic communities are expected to be affected by the dam’s construction and operations. International Rivers and Mekong Watch assure these people “will have to involuntarily resettle to make way for the project.”
This is not the first time ADB has been under intense scrutiny over a development project’s safeguard issues. [ Cont. reading ] 

heartoflaos:

ADB again under fire over safeguards in Laos dam 

Written by Lean Alfred Santos of Devex

A Hmong family living along the Nam Ngiep. An energy project threatens to displace indigenous people and destroy the environment in the area. 

The Asian Development Bank is again under fire over alleged safeguards violations, this time about a hydropower project in Laos that two NGOs claim will displace indigenous people, affect livelihoods and destroy the area’s immediate environment.

ADB decided last week to give the green light to a $50 million loan for the dam in Nam Ngiep River in central Laos, which is expected to support the sustainable development of hydropower resources in the landlocked country and provide a reliable and affordable access to energy sources in neighboring Thailand. 

“Even though the project has been approved, it should be a point of warning. ADB has a number of instances of investing in power projects [that] are not sustainable because of the effects to people,” Tanya Lee, International Rivers program director for Laos, told Devex. “In Laos, the way the development is being distributed, it is not possible for people to benefit equally.”

About 3,000 individuals from neighboring Hmong and Khmu ethnic communities are expected to be affected by the dam’s construction and operations. International Rivers and Mekong Watch assure these people “will have to involuntarily resettle to make way for the project.”

This is not the first time ADB has been under intense scrutiny over a development project’s safeguard issues. [ Cont. reading

earthstory:

Fjordlands national parkThis is Milford sound, one of several large fjords within Fjordland National Park on New Zealand’s south island.The rocks in this area were originally formed when New Zealand was on the bottom of the ocean. The rocks that are today New Zealand made up a large submarine plateau off the edge of modern-day Australia. Those rocks rifted away from Australia and were pushed up to the surface as a result of the motion of the Pacific plate, creating the two islands. Near the coast, the ancient basement rocks that were once linked to the Australian craton have been thrust upwards and exposed, allowing for mining of greenstone rocks used by the native Maori people for both jewelry and tools.Like many rugged, mountainous areas of the world, New Zealand was covered with thick alpine glaciers during the last ice age. Those glaciers carved the rocks and valleys you see here, digging the deep fjords that filled with water when the ice retreated.-JBBImage credit: Maros Mrazhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milford_Sound#mediaviewer/File:Milford_Sound_(New_Zealand).JPGRead more:http://www.milfordlodge.com/milford-sound-information/geology

earthstory:

Fjordlands national park

This is Milford sound, one of several large fjords within Fjordland National Park on New Zealand’s south island.

The rocks in this area were originally formed when New Zealand was on the bottom of the ocean. The rocks that are today New Zealand made up a large submarine plateau off the edge of modern-day Australia. Those rocks rifted away from Australia and were pushed up to the surface as a result of the motion of the Pacific plate, creating the two islands. Near the coast, the ancient basement rocks that were once linked to the Australian craton have been thrust upwards and exposed, allowing for mining of greenstone rocks used by the native Maori people for both jewelry and tools.

Like many rugged, mountainous areas of the world, New Zealand was covered with thick alpine glaciers during the last ice age. Those glaciers carved the rocks and valleys you see here, digging the deep fjords that filled with water when the ice retreated.

-JBB

Image credit: Maros Mraz
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milford_Sound#mediaviewer/File:Milford_Sound_(New_Zealand).JPG

Read more:
http://www.milfordlodge.com/milford-sound-information/geology

virtual-artifacts:

Double-headed Serpent, Aztec/Mixtec AD 1400-1521, Mexico. Copyright the Trustees of the British Museum.

Mosaic mask of Quetzalcoatl, 15th-16th century AD, From Mexico.

culturalandhistoricalvibes:

Walter S. McAfee is the African American mathematician and physicist who first calculated the speed of the moon. McAfee participated in Project Diana in the 1940s - a U.S. Army program, created to determine whether a high frequency radio signal could penetrate the earth’s outer atmosphere. To test this, scientists wanted to bounce a radar signal off the moon and back to earth. But the moon was a swiftly moving target, impossible to hit without knowing its exact speed. McAfee made the necessary calculations, and on January 10, 1946, the team sent a radar pulse through a special 40-feet square antenna towards the moon. Two and a half seconds later, they received a faint signal, proving that transmissions from earth could cross the vast distances of outer space. Official news of this scientific breakthrough did not include McAfee’s name, nor was there any recognition of the essential role he played. But Americans could not have walked on the moon had it not been for Walter S. McAfee and his calculations.
Click to see source:

culturalandhistoricalvibes:

Walter S. McAfee is the African American mathematician and physicist who first calculated the speed of the moon. McAfee participated in Project Diana in the 1940s - a U.S. Army program, created to determine whether a high frequency radio signal could penetrate the earth’s outer atmosphere. To test this, scientists wanted to bounce a radar signal off the moon and back to earth. But the moon was a swiftly moving target, impossible to hit without knowing its exact speed. McAfee made the necessary calculations, and on January 10, 1946, the team sent a radar pulse through a special 40-feet square antenna towards the moon. Two and a half seconds later, they received a faint signal, proving that transmissions from earth could cross the vast distances of outer space. Official news of this scientific breakthrough did not include McAfee’s name, nor was there any recognition of the essential role he played. But Americans could not have walked on the moon had it not been for Walter S. McAfee and his calculations.

Click to see source:

mineralists:

Azurite El Cobra Mine, Mexico

mineralists:

Azurite 
El Cobra Mine, Mexico

ancientart:

Foundation plaques B (photo 1) and A (photo 2), dating to the early 4th century BCE. Both these plaques of hammered gold have been inscribed in Old Persian, and are from Iran during the Achaemenid period.

Artefacts courtesy of the Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio, USA. Photos taken by Daderot via the Wiki Commons.

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Map of Ancient Egypt

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Map of Ancient Egypt

archaicwonder:

Medieval Silver Hands Ring, 13th-16th century
A round-section penannular hoop with bulbs and opposed hands to the finials.

archaicwonder:

Medieval Silver Hands Ring, 13th-16th century

A round-section penannular hoop with bulbs and opposed hands to the finials.

thejunglenook:

rhamphotheca:

Scientists Study “Talking” Turtles in Brazilian Amazon
via: Wildlife Conservation Society
Authors find that Giant South American river turtles have a repertoire of vocalizations for different behavioral situations, including caring for young
Turtles are well known for their longevity and protective shells, but it turns out these reptiles use sound to stick together and care for young, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations.  Scientists working in the Brazilian Amazon have found that Giant South American river turtles (Podocnemis expansa), or Arraus, actually use several different kinds of vocal communication to coordinate their social behaviors, including one used by female turtles to call to their newly hatched offspring in what is the first instance of recorded parental care in turtles.
“These distinctive sounds made by turtles give us unique insights into their behavior, although we don’t know what the sounds mean,” said Dr. Camila Ferrara, Aquatic Turtle Specialist for the WCS Brazil Program. “The social behaviors of these reptiles are much more complex than previously thought.”…
(read more: Wildlife Conservation Society)
photograph by © C. Ferrara/WCS

Don’t forget to check out the full journal article (unfortunately it isn’t open access):
Camila Rudge Ferrara, Richard C. Vogt, Renata S. Sousa-Lima, Bruno M.R. Tardio, Virginia Campos Diniz Bernardes. Sound Communication and Social Behavior in an Amazonian River Turtle (Podocnemis expansa). Herpetologica, 2014; 70 (2): 149 DOI: 10.1655/HERPETOLOGICA-D-13-00050R2

thejunglenook:

rhamphotheca:

Scientists Study “Talking” Turtles in Brazilian Amazon

via: Wildlife Conservation Society

Authors find that Giant South American river turtles have a repertoire of vocalizations for different behavioral situations, including caring for young

Turtles are well known for their longevity and protective shells, but it turns out these reptiles use sound to stick together and care for young, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations.

Scientists working in the Brazilian Amazon have found that Giant South American river turtles (Podocnemis expansa), or Arraus, actually use several different kinds of vocal communication to coordinate their social behaviors, including one used by female turtles to call to their newly hatched offspring in what is the first instance of recorded parental care in turtles.

“These distinctive sounds made by turtles give us unique insights into their behavior, although we don’t know what the sounds mean,” said Dr. Camila Ferrara, Aquatic Turtle Specialist for the WCS Brazil Program. “The social behaviors of these reptiles are much more complex than previously thought.”…

(read more: Wildlife Conservation Society)

photograph by © C. Ferrara/WCS

Don’t forget to check out the full journal article (unfortunately it isn’t open access):

Camila Rudge Ferrara, Richard C. Vogt, Renata S. Sousa-Lima, Bruno M.R. Tardio, Virginia Campos Diniz Bernardes. Sound Communication and Social Behavior in an Amazonian River Turtle (Podocnemis expansa)Herpetologica, 2014; 70 (2): 149 DOI: 10.1655/HERPETOLOGICA-D-13-00050R2

into-theuniverse:

M8: Lagoon Nebula

into-theuniverse:

M8: Lagoon Nebula