ZThemes
thatscienceguy:

Incredibly high speed photography shows how fast a fly can maneuver. This fly makes a 45 degree turn while moving at high speeds in a ridiculously small time span, much faster than any man made aircraft can perform.

thatscienceguy:

Incredibly high speed photography shows how fast a fly can maneuver. This fly makes a 45 degree turn while moving at high speeds in a ridiculously small time span, much faster than any man made aircraft can perform.

ancientart:

Cave 19 at the Ajanta Caves, Maharashtra, India.

Ajanta contains 30 excavated rock-cut caves which belong to two distinct phases of Buddhism: the Hinayana phase (2nd century BC-1st century AD) and the Mahayana phase (5th century AD-6th century AD). These caves are considered to be one the finest examples of early Buddhist architecture, cave-paintings, and sculpture.

The Archaeological Survey of India, Aurangabad Circle, speaks specifically of Cave 19:

The small chityagriha [prayer hall] is considered one of the most perfect specimens of Buddhist art in India. The exquisitely decorated facade and beautiful interior form a grand combination of richness of detail and graceful proportion. The inscription in Cave 17 records that a feudatory prince under Vakataka King Harisena was a munificent donor of this cave, datable to the 5th century AD. It consists of a small but elegant portico, verandah, a hall, and chapels. The apsidal hall is divided into a nave, an elaborate and elongated drum, and a globular dome which stands against the apse. 

The pillars and the stupa are intricately carved with the figures of Lord Buddha and other decorative motifs. The sidewalls are also adorned with countless figures of Buddha while the ceiling is filled with painted floral motifs in which animals, birds, and human figures are cleverly interwoven. The chapel contains the panel of Nagaraja with his consort known for its serenity and royal dignity.

The first and second photos were taken by Kirk Kittell, the third is by Arian Zwegers.

What advice do you have for someone considering getting an axolotl?
Anonymous

koryos:

1. Do you have plans in place to keep it for up to 15 years? Do you know a responsible breeder? Don’t buy them from pet stores; they usually keep them in awful conditions. If possible, try to find one that needs rehoming- but luckily, I don’t think they are a pet that people give up very often.

2. Adult axolotls will require at least a 20 gallon tank. No gravel, as they will eat anything, including rocks, smaller than their heads. Certain axolotls (Moony) will attempt to eat rocks that are larger than their heads, but that’s usually not a problem.

3. Know what you’re feeding them. High protein, low fiber pellets work fine, or for live food earthworms or bloodworms. It’s easiest to buy pellets in bulk online rather than trawling the local pet stores.

4. Filter is optional, but if you don’t, prepare to do at least a 10% water change every day, 50% every couple weeks. If you do use a filter, you’re still gonna have to do water changes once a week or so. They’re messy critters.

5. Buy plants if you want, but I hope you enjoy re-rooting them. (Or, in Moony’s case, finding bites taken out of them.)

6. No need for a tank light. They hate it.

7. Axolotls must be solitary until they are at least six inches long, unless you want to wake up and find your babies happily eating each others’ legs and gills. Also, if you buy two juveniles, you have to be prepared for the possibility that you’ll get a male and a female. Then you’ll have to house them separately. Trust me, I’ve raised babies before.

8. They’re illegal to keep in California and New Jersey and possibly some places out of the U.S. Check your local laws.

romkids:

gisellecwestart:

Fun times at the ROM. The ticket sales men made my day when he told me I got in free on Tuesday’s because of my post secondary education. Then I went to sonic boom! and found a Tegan and Sara cd that I was missing for a steal of a deal. Its been an awesome day so far:) I hope everyone has had a great day tonight.

This is pretty much a greatest hits of some of the best natural history specimens we have on display!

More information on Free Student Tuesdays HERE!

mineralia:

mineralia:

Tanzanite from Tanzania

My Tanzanite post from 3 years ago resurfaced on my dashboard!

mineralia:

mineralia:

Tanzanite from Tanzania

My Tanzanite post from 3 years ago resurfaced on my dashboard!

ancientart:

Seated divinity. Maya Culture, Rio Bec (?) or Chenes region, Mexico, Classic period. Made of polychrome stucco, dates to between circa 550 and circa 950.

Former collection of Jean Lions, 1970s; former collection of H. Law; auctioned by Binoche & Giquello on 21 March 2011. Photo taken by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

ancientpeoples:

Sandstone statue of king Montuhotep II 
Statue of the king shows him in his Heb-sed (jubilee) costume. This feast was meant to renew the king’s youth and demonstrate his strength as king, so as to be show to be fit to rule Egypt. 
Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 11th dynasty, 2051 - 2000 BC. 
Found in Thebes, Deir el-Bahri, temple of Montuhotep II 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Sandstone statue of king Montuhotep II 

Statue of the king shows him in his Heb-sed (jubilee) costume. This feast was meant to renew the king’s youth and demonstrate his strength as king, so as to be show to be fit to rule Egypt. 

Egyptian, Middle Kingdom, 11th dynasty, 2051 - 2000 BC. 

Found in Thebes, Deir el-Bahri, temple of Montuhotep II 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

mindblowingscience:

Scientists Create Artificial Blood That Can Be Produced On An Industrial Scale: A Limitless Supply Of Blood?

Scientists have found a way to produce human blood, potentially on an industrial scale — thanks to a certain University of Edinburgh professor, Marc Turner, and his program’s funds from the Wellcome Trust.
With this new method, scientists hope they’ll produce a sort of “limitless” supply of type-O red blood cells, free of diseases and able to be transfused into any patient. Blood transfusions are used to replace lost blood after an injury or surgery. According to the National Institutes of Health, every year five million Americans require blood transfusions.
Through the use of pluripotent stem cells — regular cells removed from thehuman bodyand then transformed into stem cells — Turner and his team of researchers were able to create blood type Ored blood cells. The technique will be tested in live humans for the first time, in a trial running through 2016 or 2017. In the experiments, researchers will test the artificial blood on people who have thalassaemia, a blood disorder that requires several transfusions.
“Although similar research has been conducted elsewhere, this is the first time anybody has manufactured blood to the appropriate quality and safety standards for transfusion into a human being,” Turner told The Telegraph.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Scientists Create Artificial Blood That Can Be Produced On An Industrial Scale: A Limitless Supply Of Blood?

Scientists have found a way to produce human blood, potentially on an industrial scale — thanks to a certain University of Edinburgh professor, Marc Turner, and his program’s funds from the Wellcome Trust.

With this new method, scientists hope they’ll produce a sort of “limitless” supply of type-O red blood cells, free of diseases and able to be transfused into any patient. Blood transfusions are used to replace lost blood after an injury or surgery. According to the National Institutes of Health, every year five million Americans require blood transfusions.

Through the use of pluripotent stem cells — regular cells removed from thehuman bodyand then transformed into stem cells — Turner and his team of researchers were able to create blood type Ored blood cells. The technique will be tested in live humans for the first time, in a trial running through 2016 or 2017. In the experiments, researchers will test the artificial blood on people who have thalassaemia, a blood disorder that requires several transfusions.

“Although similar research has been conducted elsewhere, this is the first time anybody has manufactured blood to the appropriate quality and safety standards for transfusion into a human being,” Turner told The Telegraph.

Continue Reading.

shychemist:

allthecanadianpolitics:

High tuition, high debt, high unemployment: Being a young adult is tougher than it used to be

There are a countless number of songs, poems and books about how great it is to be young.
Middle and senior-aged Canadians across the country often yearn for the good old days.
"How great would it be to be 21 again," you might hear one say.
Well, maybe being young isn’t such a good thing anymore.
A new analysis — by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives — adds to the growing number of recent surveys, studies and reports highlighting how difficult life is for 18- to 30-year-olds.
This one is about university tuition rates.
According to the report released on Tuesday, the average annual undergraduate tuition fee in Canada has skyrocketed from $551 in 1975 to $5,772 in 2013.
A more telling statistic, however, is the number of hours necessary for a student to work, at minimum wage, in order to pay for their own schooling.
As explained by CBC News, a student in 1975 only needed to work 230 minimum-wage hours to pay for their post-secondary education. Today, students need to work at least 570 hours.
The ‘high’ tuition rates are invariably leading to record historically high student debt levels, according to the Canadian Federation of Students.
"Skyrocketing tuition fees and the prevalence of loan-based financial assistance have pushed student debt to historic levels," notes the organization’s website.
"This past year, almost 425,000 students were forced to borrow in order to finance their education. The aggregate of loans disbursed by the Canada Student Loans Program, less the aggregate of loan repayments received is resulting in student debt increasing by $1 million per day."
According to a 2013 BMO Annual Student Survey, 86 per cent of Canadian students expect to graduate with debt, with 21 per cent expecting a debt load of more than $40,000.
And of course, that’s not the only debt young people are going to be saddled with.
The Canadian Taxpayers Federation recently launched a new initiative — aptly named Generation Screwed — warning young Canadians about the impending fiscal cliff that they’re ultimately going to be responsible for.
"Past generations voted to spend more and more money expanding entitlements and the size of government," notes their website.
"They are handing the next generation the bill."
The story of young peoples’ lot in life gets worse: youth unemployment rates across the country are dismal.
Our youth unemployment rate is about 14 per cent and, if you include youth up to age 30, there are approximately 904,000 Canadians not in employment, education or training.
And those who have jobs aren’t very confident about the future.
Here are some of the highlights — or low-lights, if you will — of a recent Abacus Data/Broadbent Institute survey about millennials’ collective fears about the future:


Overall, 41 per cent of millennials are worried that their generation will be able to pay enough tax to support their parents’ social programs
38 per cent of millenials with university degrees believe that their economic opportunities are worse than those of their parents.
60 per cent of millienials think the gap between rich and poor will grow over their life with only 16 per cent thinking it will shrink.
Only one-third of millienials are “certain” that they will own a home at retirement


Let’s face it: being young isn’t what it used to be.
(Photo courtesy Reuters)


This is so important.

shychemist:

allthecanadianpolitics:

High tuition, high debt, high unemployment: Being a young adult is tougher than it used to be

There are a countless number of songs, poems and books about how great it is to be young.

Middle and senior-aged Canadians across the country often yearn for the good old days.

"How great would it be to be 21 again," you might hear one say.

Well, maybe being young isn’t such a good thing anymore.

A new analysis — by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives — adds to the growing number of recent surveys, studies and reports highlighting how difficult life is for 18- to 30-year-olds.

This one is about university tuition rates.

According to the report released on Tuesday, the average annual undergraduate tuition fee in Canada has skyrocketed from $551 in 1975 to $5,772 in 2013.

A more telling statistic, however, is the number of hours necessary for a student to work, at minimum wage, in order to pay for their own schooling.

As explained by CBC News, a student in 1975 only needed to work 230 minimum-wage hours to pay for their post-secondary education. Today, students need to work at least 570 hours.

The ‘high’ tuition rates are invariably leading to record historically high student debt levels, according to the Canadian Federation of Students.

"Skyrocketing tuition fees and the prevalence of loan-based financial assistance have pushed student debt to historic levels," notes the organization’s website.

"This past year, almost 425,000 students were forced to borrow in order to finance their education. The aggregate of loans disbursed by the Canada Student Loans Program, less the aggregate of loan repayments received is resulting in student debt increasing by $1 million per day."

According to a 2013 BMO Annual Student Survey, 86 per cent of Canadian students expect to graduate with debt, with 21 per cent expecting a debt load of more than $40,000.

And of course, that’s not the only debt young people are going to be saddled with.

The Canadian Taxpayers Federation recently launched a new initiative — aptly named Generation Screwed — warning young Canadians about the impending fiscal cliff that they’re ultimately going to be responsible for.

"Past generations voted to spend more and more money expanding entitlements and the size of government," notes their website.

"They are handing the next generation the bill."

The story of young peoples’ lot in life gets worse: youth unemployment rates across the country are dismal.

Our youth unemployment rate is about 14 per cent and, if you include youth up to age 30, there are approximately 904,000 Canadians not in employment, education or training.

And those who have jobs aren’t very confident about the future.

Here are some of the highlights — or low-lights, if you will — of a recent Abacus Data/Broadbent Institute survey about millennials’ collective fears about the future:

  • Overall, 41 per cent of millennials are worried that their generation will be able to pay enough tax to support their parents’ social programs

  • 38 per cent of millenials with university degrees believe that their economic opportunities are worse than those of their parents.

  • 60 per cent of millienials think the gap between rich and poor will grow over their life with only 16 per cent thinking it will shrink.

  • Only one-third of millienials are “certain” that they will own a home at retirement

Let’s face it: being young isn’t what it used to be.

(Photo courtesy Reuters)

This is so important.